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A Relational Hierarchy

Some biological/ecological criteria for classic relationships between living organisms

See JW's article Re-languaging the Creative for more context.

ecoP1P2CouplingDescription
grey-spacer.png +++ grey-spacer.png MutualEcosystem benefits / beneficial to both partners
grey-spacer.png ++0CommensalEcosystem benefits / one partner benefits / no harm to the other.
grey-spacer.png ++ExploitativeEcosystem benefits / one partner benefits at expense of other.
grey-spacer.png +0AmensalEcosystem benefits / negative effect on one of the partners
grey-spacer.png +CompetitiveEcosystem benefits / both partners suffer
grey-spacer.png 0++ grey-spacer.png MutualNeutral to ecosystem / beneficial to both partners
grey-spacer.png 0+0CommensalNeutral to ecosystem / one partner benefits / no harm to the other.
grey-spacer.png 0+ExploitativeNeutral to ecosystem / one partner benefits at expense of other.
grey-spacer.png 00AmensalNeutral to ecosystem / negative effects on one of the partners
grey-spacer.png 0Competitive grey-spacer.png Neutral to ecosystem / both partners suffer
grey-spacer.png 000NeutralNeutral to ecosystem / no benefits or difficulties for either partner.
grey-spacer.png ++ grey-spacer.png MutualDamage to ecosystem / beneficial to both partners
grey-spacer.png +0CommensalDamage to ecosystem / one partner benefits / no harm to the other.
grey-spacer.png +ExploitativeDamage to ecosystem / one partner benefits at expense of other.
grey-spacer.png 0AmensalDamage to ecosystem / negative effects on one of the partners
grey-spacer.png CompetitiveDamage to ecosystem / both partners suffer

Table 2: Relative benefit/loss chart for different types of coupling


See also Grading Asset Relations
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